Sunday, 2 August 2009

Remember the dome? Remember how much it cost?

I read today that Trinity College, Cambridge are thinking of buying the Millennium Dome. However, the thing that caught my eye was the price - just £20 million.

There are plenty of terraced houses in London that go for over a £1 million. Thus it would appear that the millennium dome is worth approximately 20 mid-priced London homes.

Something is not right here. Either the Dome is under priced, or London property valuations are a tadge inflated. Indeed, it is possible that both statements could be true.

According to the UK National Audit Office, the total original cost of the Dome was £789 million, of which £628 million came from that tax on stupidity otherwise known as the National Lottery. How could it be that a building costing that much money end up being sold for just £20 million?

Given the the lamentable lack of accountability in Britain today, is there any point even asking such a question?

7 comments:

Seema said...

Oh why did you bring up the dome? I had forgotten that shambolic enterprise.

Pure NuLabour...

Anonymous said...

Is there any assumption of debt?

boiling frog said...

Wouldn't it be handy for the Olympics, in case something isn't finished on time?

Mitch said...

This was mandelsons baby, a worrying look at his competence as PM.

formertory said...

I hate to be the wet blanket, but the Dome was actually the "brainchild" of the Conservative administration under Major, before Bliar decided it would be another wonderful opportunity to steal the Emperor's clothes.

True, the delivery was down to NuLabour, but unfortunately it was the Conservatives that started the rot.

Not a one of them can be trusted.

Fred said...

I think both Tory and Labour share the responsibility for the dome.

Labour did threaten to cancel the project after the election unless they were consulted and signed off on it before they got into power.

Andy said...

The actual dome bit cost around £48m to build, it was all the drivel that they piled inside it plus the endless consultants fees that pushed the overall cost so high.